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May 30, 2007

Comments

KD

If you enjoy Indie films you should check out Jaman. If you join with the link below they are giving away four free movies.
www.jaman.com/promo/cine.

Brenda K

About a week I went to a screening of a film by Marquette Williams in Los Angeles. I saw a great independent film by a passionate and charismatic filmmaker that told an engaging story about child molestation and the social service system in a unique way. The film is a dark thriller focusing on a masked man who takes a family hostage. The reason I was there is because I work in development at a major studio. My boss who was with me decided to pass on the film. Stating it was not black enough, there were no stars and who wants to hear about this type of. For me it was an amazing film that fostered diversity both in the cast but in the crew also. I stated this fact and he scuffed me off. As a black woman I wonder how so many black films that make our men and women look bad get made. Honestly I know why because we will go see any film with our folks on the screen. But we need more directors like Marquette Williams that are making film about black people without telling the world what African-American culture is or is not. We as a people are much deeper than the entertainment products we sell at this time and point. We need diverse story lines and diverse points of view of our culture. Please support UNSPEAKABLE and other small films like this. Here are a few links I have found on the web.
UNSPEAKABLE on you tube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrCBziXs3S4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sbPkL6yH6c
https://www.wcpn.org/index.php/WCPN/an/7756

https://www.myspace.com/cinema216

Ryan

“Wages of Fear,” “Convoy,” Smokey and the Bandit” and “Duel”

Remember these great flicks? What are they? Road movies, of course, but more importantly, they are trucking films. Here is a genre nearly forgotten that Navistar, which builds legendary International trucks, hopes to single-handedly revive.

The company that just launched a revolution in long haul trucking by building the mold-shattering LoneStar Class 8 tractor is now launching another first - a student film competition that will ask aspiring auteurs and cineastes to celebrate the lives and labors of long-distance truck drivers in a short film format.

You could be the next Spielberg, Sam Peckinpah or even Henri-Georges Clouzot.

On May 1, 2008, Navistar is sending out a call for entries to approximately 50 universities and film schools around the country asking ambitious filmmakers to hit the road and produce short films or videos that honor the American trucker. These emerging mavericks will then submit their final product in a competition to win film school tuition or top-notch camera equipment.

Academy award nominated producer/director Brett Morgan (Chicago 10, The Kids Stays in the Pictures) will chair a jury of filmmakers who will judge all submissions. First, second and third prize winners will premiere their films at The Great American Trucking show in Dallas, Texas, on August 22, 2008, and will be featured as streaming content on InternationalTrucks.com. The films will also be included as bonus material on a DVD with “Stand Alone,” Brett Morgen’s upcoming feature length film about truckers.

It’s time for new filmmakers to release the jake-brake, hammer down, and make cinema that really matters, films about real life on the road. Put it this way: if America’s drivers decided to stop working, the entire country would shut down. We depend on truckers to deliver everything we own and consume. Truckers are that important. They are true American heroes.

Merle Haggard sang it this way: “The whiteline is a lifeline for the nation… It takes a special breed to be a truck drivin' man, And a steady hand to pull that load behind.”

Ryan

“Wages of Fear,” “Convoy,” Smokey and the Bandit” and “Duel”

Remember these great flicks? What are they? Road movies, of course, but more importantly, they are trucking films. Here is a genre nearly forgotten that Navistar, which builds legendary International trucks, hopes to single-handedly revive.

The company that just launched a revolution in long haul trucking by building the mold-shattering LoneStar Class 8 tractor is now launching another first - a student film competition that will ask aspiring auteurs and cineastes to celebrate the lives and labors of long-distance truck drivers in a short film format.

You could be the next Spielberg, Sam Peckinpah or even Henri-Georges Clouzot.

On May 1, 2008, Navistar is sending out a call for entries to approximately 50 universities and film schools around the country asking ambitious filmmakers to hit the road and produce short films or videos that honor the American trucker. These mavericks will then submit their final product in a competition to win film school tuition or top-notch camera equipment.

Academy award nominated producer/director Brett Morgan (Chicago 10, The Kids Stays in the Pictures) will chair a jury of filmmakers who will judge all submissions. First, second and third prize winners will premiere their films at The Great American Trucking show in Dallas, Texas, on August 22, 2008, and will be featured as streaming content on InternationalTrucks.com. The films will also be included as bonus material on a DVD with “Stand Alone,” Brett Morgen’s upcoming Navistar-funded documentary about truckers.

It’s time for filmmakers to release the jake-brake, hammer down, and make cinema that really matters, films about real life on the road. Put it this way: if America’s drivers decided to stop working, the entire country would shut down. We depend on truckers to deliver everything we own and consume. Truckers are that important. They are true American heroes.

Merle Haggard sang it this way: “The whiteline is a lifeline for the nation… It takes a special breed to be a truck drivin' man, And a steady hand to pull that load behind.”

This Wednesday 25th March at the London College of Fashion, if you're quick enough you can snap up a ticket ( 15 0r 7 concession for tickets log onto www. fashionfringe. co. uk ) to witness the likes of Harvey Nichols Buying Director Averyl Oates, Editor of Vogue. co. uk Dolly Jones, Editor- in- Chief of Elle Lorraine Candy, to name but a few, discussing fashion in London and running a business. All under the watchful eye of Colin McDowell Founder and Creative Director of Fashion Fringe At Covent Garden...

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Elsewhere you will have to pay extra for this feature

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